LDN TALKS AT NIGHT: Memories and Time Travel

We trust our memory is reliable, and that our recollection of events is an accurate reflection of what actually happened, but this is not the case. We've known, since the 1920s, that memory is reconstructive, rather than reproductive. In other words, memory does not work like a video recorder, but instead is subject to cognitive biases that places new information within the context of pre-existing memories. We do not remember things exactly as they happened, but rather as we want to remember them.

In this talk, Moheb Costandi will describe classic research into the reconstructive nature of memory, and explains the implications of it for eyewitness testimony and suspect identification, both of which are heavily reliant on memory. He will then go on to describe a new way of thinking about memory - that its main function is not to recall the past, but to predict the future.

Costandi trained as a molecular and developmental neurobiologist and now works as a freelance writer specialising in neuroscience. He has written for the BBC, Nature, New Scientist, and Scientific American, among others. He is the author of Neuroplasticity (MIT Press, 2016) and 50 Human Brain Ideas You Really Need to Know (Quercus, 2013), and he also writes the Neurophilosophy blog, hosted by The Guardian.

Doors: 7pm / Talk starts: 7.30pm

LDN Talks @ Night is a fresh new concept making "Tedx" talks more accessible. We've pulled in an impressive array of leading entrepreneurs, movers & shakers, bright thinkers and incredible individuals to give you a different perspective, to enthuse and inspire!

Tickets from the link below:

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LDN TALKS AT NIGHT: Memories and Time Travel
We trust our memory is reliable, and that our recollection of events is an accurate reflection of what actually happened, but this is not the case. We've known, since the 1920s, that memory is reconstructive, rather than reproductive. In other words, memory does not work like a video recorder, but instead is subject to cognitive biases that places new information within the context of pre-existing memories. We do not remember things exactly as they happened, but rather as we want to remember them.

In this talk, Moheb Costandi will describe classic research into the reconstructive nature of memory, and explains the implications of it for eyewitness testimony and suspect identification, both of which are heavily reliant on memory. He will then go on to describe a new way of thinking about memory - that its main function is not to recall the past, but to predict the future.

Costandi trained as a molecular and developmental neurobiologist and now works as a freelance writer specialising in neuroscience. He has written for the BBC, Nature, New Scientist, and Scientific American, among others. He is the author of Neuroplasticity (MIT Press, 2016) and 50 Human Brain Ideas You Really Need to Know (Quercus, 2013), and he also writes the Neurophilosophy blog, hosted by The Guardian.

Doors: 7pm / Talk starts: 7.30pm

LDN Talks @ Night is a fresh new concept making "Tedx" talks more accessible. We've pulled in an impressive array of leading entrepreneurs, movers & shakers, bright thinkers and incredible individuals to give you a different perspective, to enthuse and inspire!

Tickets from the link below: