LDN TALKS @ NIGHT: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RAVING

Doors open: 7 pm / Talk starts: 7.30 pm

The body and the soul are traditionally perceived as separate entities within Western culture. However, Beate Peter will argue that dance has the potential to unite them. Drawing on Carl Gustav Jung, who distinguishes between personal unconscious and collective unconscious, she will argue that dance allows us to access our collective unconscious and consequently, a more fully discovered self.

Accessing the unconscious through dance is commonly practised within tribal societies, particularly in shamanic dances, in which a demon is thought to speak through an individual who is being possessed. In such a case, the dancer could be seen as expressing an internal voice, for example their own self and soul, rather than an external demonic force. Dance provides an opportunity to discover our self more completely, embracing the unconscious part of our identities through the physicality of our bodies.

Peterís research in electronic dance music argues the same. Electronic music facilitates this kind of dance-discovery. Its musical features allow the release of emotions within a community of dancers, where the body becomes the soul, and the individual becomes the collective.

Tickets below:

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LDN TALKS @ NIGHT: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RAVING
Doors open: 7 pm / Talk starts: 7.30 pm

The body and the soul are traditionally perceived as separate entities within Western culture. However, Beate Peter will argue that dance has the potential to unite them. Drawing on Carl Gustav Jung, who distinguishes between personal unconscious and collective unconscious, she will argue that dance allows us to access our collective unconscious and consequently, a more fully discovered self.

Accessing the unconscious through dance is commonly practised within tribal societies, particularly in shamanic dances, in which a demon is thought to speak through an individual who is being possessed. In such a case, the dancer could be seen as expressing an internal voice, for example their own self and soul, rather than an external demonic force. Dance provides an opportunity to discover our self more completely, embracing the unconscious part of our identities through the physicality of our bodies.

Peterís research in electronic dance music argues the same. Electronic music facilitates this kind of dance-discovery. Its musical features allow the release of emotions within a community of dancers, where the body becomes the soul, and the individual becomes the collective.

Tickets below:

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